Control of Outdoor Laser Hazards

  • James Franks
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 242)

Abstract

Tank-mounted laser rangefinders (LRF) were fielded in the US Army in the early 70’s. Since that time laser target designators (LTD) and direct fire simulators (DFS) have been developed. Fire-control lasers (LRFs and LTDs) are either Class 3 or Class 4 systems according to the laser hazard classification scheme used by the U.S. Army. These fire-control lasers can cause serious retinal injury from exposure to the direct beam and may only be operated with restrictive procedures in the training environment. DFS are training devices that are used to simulate the firing of direct fire weapons in the tactical training environment. The DFS are considered safe for field use and the use of DFS constitute the biggest occupational exposure to lasers in the US Army.

Keywords

Exposure Limit North Atlantic Treaty Organization American National Standard Institute Atmospheric Attenuation Exit Pupil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Franks
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene AgencyUSA

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