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Measurements of Welding Arcs and Plasma Arcs

  • Paul Eriksen
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 242)

Abstract

Welding and plasma arcs are among the most powerful emitters of optical radiation. The temperature of welding and plasma arcs is extremely high and the ultraviolet output is therefore potentially hazardous. As is well known the visible radiation emitted by these arcs is blinding, and several cases of severe retinal burns are known to have caused blindness. Theoretically, the emitted infrared radiation should be substantial, giving rise to concern about chronic exposures that might possibly enhance cataract formation. Apart from being extremely hazardous in itself the radiation can produce other harmful and toxic substances such as ozone, nitric oxides and particulates.

Keywords

Spectral Irradiance Consumable Electrode Threshold Limit Value Aberdeen Prove Ground Discomfort Glare 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Eriksen
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Occupational HealthCopenhagenDenmark

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