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The Effects of Literacy on the Earnings of Hispanics in the United States

  • Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz
Part of the Environment, Development and Public Policy book series (EDPP)

Abstract

In March 1989, close to 20 million persons (or about 8%) of the population of the United States was of Spanish origin. In recent years, the economic condition of Hispanics has received much attention, and studies examining the determinants of earnings among this group have proliferated (see, for instance, Bean & Tien-da, 1987; Borjas & Tienda, 1985; and DeFreitas, 1990). One aspect that has not received much attention in this literature is the role that literacy skills play in constraining the economic opportunities of Hispanics.

Keywords

Labor Market Literacy Skill Wage Equation English Language Proficiency Reading Proficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Urban and Minority Education, and Department of Economics and Education, Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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