Work and Family Responsibilities of Women in New York City

  • Terry J. Rosenberg
Part of the Environment, Development and Public Policy book series (EDPP)

Abstract

National studies of family income and poverty have shown that Puerto Rican families are concentrated in the lowest income levels, and that Puerto Rican families are among the poorest in the United States (Tienda & Jensen, 1987; U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1987). Likewise, in the New York Metropolitan Area and in New York City itself, Puerto Rican families—whether compared to all other families or to other Hispanic families—have very low incomes and extremely high rates of poverty (Cooney & Colon, 1980; Rosenberg, 1987, 1989).

Keywords

Labor Force White Woman Black Woman Labor Force Participation Family Responsibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terry J. Rosenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Community Service SocietyNew YorkUSA

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