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The Application of Cognitive Therapy to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

  • Carol A. Parrott
  • Janice L. Howes
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Overview

In the present chapter, cognitive therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (P.T.S.D.) in response to life-threatening trauma is outlined. The history of traumatic stress disorders is briefly discussed, followed by the current definition of P.T.S.D. (DSM-III-R; American Psychiatric Association, 1987). Etiological factors, and the role of pretrauma and posttrauma factors, are considered in the conceptualization of posttraumatic stress disorder. The focus of the chapter is on the phenomonological experience of trauma for the P.T.S.D. victim. The following cognitive issues are highlighted: appraisal of trauma, generalized belief of vulnerability, self-questioning, and self-appraisal. The implementation of cognitive therapy with P.T.S.D. victims is then explicated. Specific issues discussed include flexibility, resistance, therapeutic relationship, and acknowledgment and support. Case examples are used to illustrate a flexible cognitive therapy approach to the treatment of this disorder. Most of the clinical examples discussed are taken from the injured worker population.

Keywords

Traumatic Event Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Cognitive Therapy Injured Worker Phobic Anxiety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol A. Parrott
    • 1
  • Janice L. Howes
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Private PracticeMississaugaCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryDalhousie UniversityCanada
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyCamp Hill Medical CenterHalifaxCanada

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