The Therapeutic Relationship and Resistance to Change in Cognitive Therapy

  • Marsha M. Rothstein
  • Paul J. Robinson
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

A positive therapeutic relationship is considered to be a necessary component of all forms of cognitive therapy, particularly as a necessary prerequisite for cognitive techniques to be effective (Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979; Guidano, 1987). However, the patient-therapist relationship can be seen as providing more than just the groundwork upon which cognitive-behavioral interventions occur (Guidano & Liotti, 1983; Safran & Segal, 1990). The therapeutic relationship itself can be used as an intervention to explore relevant issues in cognitive therapy. That is, the relationship can be the means to help certain patients identify, understand, and change cognitions and metacognitions which, in turn, may lead to more satisfying and enduring therapeutic change.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Therapeutic Relationship Personal Meaning Personal Construct Cognitive Therapist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marsha M. Rothstein
    • 1
  • Paul J. Robinson
    • 2
  1. 1.Independent PracticeDelisle Court Professional CenterTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyNorth York General HospitalWillowdaleCanada

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