Theoretical and Conceptual Bases of Cognitive Therapy

  • T. Michael Vallis
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Any review of the literature on psychotherapy, even the most cursory perusal, will make reference to the “cognitive revolution” (e. g., Mahoney & Freeman, 1985). Cognitive perspectives on psychopathology and clinical treatment have been advocated for a number of years. Ellis’s work on rational-emotive therapy (RET; e. g., Ellis & Greiger, 1977) and Beck’s cognitive-phenomenological formulations of the emotional disorders (e. g., Beck, 1976) are examples of this early work. However, during the last decade there has been an exponential growth of interest in cognitive therapy. The number of publications on cognitive therapy continue to proliferate. There are now two journals specifically devoted to cognitive therapy: Cognitive Therapy and Research (established in 1977 and published by Plenum Press) and the recent Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly (established in 1987 and published by Springer Publishing Corporation). Further, courses on cognitive therapy are being offered in clinical psychology graduate programs (e. g., the University of British Columbia; Dalhousie University), and are incorporated into psychiatry residency training programs (e. g., the University of Toronto; Dalhousie University). Finally, centers for cognitive therapy have been established throughout North America (e. g., the Center for Cognitive Therapy in Philadelphia; the New York Centerfor Cognitive Therapy; the Center for Cognitive Therapy in Newport Beach, California; the Cognitive and Behavior Therapies Section at the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, Toronto). The most recent World Congress of Cognitive Therapy held in Oxford, England, in June 1989, was attended by over 800 participants.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Cognitive Structure Automatic Thought Constructivist Perspective Dysfunctional Belief 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Michael Vallis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Psychology and PsychiatryDalhousie UniversityCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCamp Hill Medical CenterHalifaxCanada

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