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Renaissance in Research on Temperament Where To?

  • Jan Strelau
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

“The modern history of temperament research began in the late 1950s with the New York Longitudinal Study conducted by Alexander Thomas, Stella Chess, and their colleagues” (Plomin, 1986, p. ix). This statement holds true for the United States only.

Keywords

Individual Difference Sensation Seek Temperament Dimension Nervous Process Eysenck Personality Questionnaire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Strelau
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Individual Differences, Faculty of PsychologyUniversity of WarsawWarsawPoland

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