Orthodox RET Taught Effectively with Graphics, Feedback on Irrational Beliefs, a Structured Homework Series, and Models of Disputation

  • Paul J. Woods
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

As a result of 25 years of teaching experience before I actually began practicing psychotherapy, I structured the early stages of RET therapy with clients along the lines of a teacher structuring a learning experience. During my associate fellow training at the Institute for Rational-Emotive Therapy in New York, I was urged to be more “evocative” and less “didactic.” Subsequently, what I have tried to do is combine a lecturing style with an evocative interaction style.

Keywords

Emotional Reaction Emotional Consequence Irrational Belief Anger Expression Rational Alternative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul J. Woods
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyHollins CollegeRoanokeUSA

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