Advertisement

Keys to Effective RET

  • Russell M. Grieger
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Let me begin this chapter by stating that I practice rational-emotive therapy (RET). I am thoroughly convinced of the primary importance of human thinking and conceptualization in feeling and acting; I incessantly conceptualize my clients’ problems in ABC terms; I assume that emotional and behavioral disturbances result from a person’s endorsing and living by perfectionistic demanding, awfulizing, and/or self-rating philosophies; I believe that profound, elegant change follows when humans give up these philosophies and alternatively endorse preferring, antiawfulizing, and self-accepting ones; I practice RET in an energetic, active, directive way; I see my therapeutic role as being more of a teacher and coach than a doctor; I attempt to blanket my clients with emotive and behavioral as well as cognitive techniques; I see cognitive disputation as the major tool of change; and, assuming that people will inevitably slip back to their former pathologies unless they continue to work on themselves the rest of their lives, I emphasize the importance of their learning both the theory and the techniques of RET for future use so that they do not have to rely on me in the future. I attempt to practice all this with individuals, with couples, with parents, with families, and in groups (including workshops and seminars).

Keywords

Emotional Disturbance Irrational Belief Homework Assignment Life Position Dysfunctional Attitude Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Pamphlets And Articles

  1. Burns, David D. (1980). The perfectionist’s script for self-defeat. Psychology Today, November, 34-35.Google Scholar
  2. Ellis, Albert. (1971). Emotional disturbance and its treatment in a nutshell. Canadian Counselor, 5 (3), 168–71.Google Scholar
  3. Ellis, Albert. (1973). The no cop-out theory. Psychology Today, July, 13-23.Google Scholar
  4. Ellis, Albert. (1973). Unhealthy love: Its causes and treatment. In Mary Ellen Curtin (Ed.), Symposium on Love. New York: Behavioral Publications.Google Scholar
  5. Ellis, Albert. (1975). RET abolishes most of the human ego. Paper delivered at the American Psychological Association National Convention, September.Google Scholar

Books

  1. Burns, David D. (1980). Feeling good: The new mood therapy. New York: William Morrow.Google Scholar
  2. Burns, David D. (1985). Intimate connections. New York: William Morrow.Google Scholar
  3. Ellis, Albert. (1975). How to live with a neurotic. North Hollywood, Calif.: Wilshire.Google Scholar
  4. Ellis, Albert, and Becker, Irving. (1982). A guide to personal happiness. North Hollywood, Calif.: Wilshire.Google Scholar
  5. Ellis, Albert, and Harper, Robert A. (1975). A new guide to rational living. North Hollywood, Calif.: Wilshire.Google Scholar
  6. Maultsby, Maxie C. Jr. (1975). Help yourself to happiness. New York: Institute for Rational Living.Google Scholar
  7. Miller, Tom. (1983). So, you secretly suspect you’re worthless! Well... Skaneateles, N.Y.: Lakeside Printing.Google Scholar

Bibliography

  1. Ellis, A. (1976). The biological basis of human irrationality. Journal of Individual Psychology, 32, 145–68.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Ellis, A. (1978). Family therapy: A phenomenological and active-directive approach. Journal of Marriage and Family Counseling, 4(2), 43–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ellis, A. (1985). Overcoming resistance: Rational-emotive therapy with difficult clients. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Ellis, A. (1987). The impossibility of achieving consistently good mental health. American Psychologist, 42(4), 364–375.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Ellis, A., & Harper, R. (1975). A new guide to rational living. North Hollywood, Calif.: Wilshire.Google Scholar
  6. Grieger, R., & Boyd, J. (1980). Rational-emotive therapy: A skills-based approach. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.Google Scholar
  7. Maultsby, M. C., Jr. (1975). Help yourself to happiness: Through rational self-counseling. New York: Institute for Rational-Emotive Therapy.Google Scholar
  8. Maultsby, M. C., Jr. (1984). Rational behavior therapy. Englewood, Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar

References

  1. Brandon, N. (1983). Honoring the self: Personal integrity and the heroic potentials of human nature. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher.Google Scholar
  2. DiGiuseppe, R., & Zee, C. (1986). A rational-emotive theory of marital dysfunction and marital therapy. Journal of Rational-Emotive Therapy. 4, 22–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Dryden, W. (1988). Comments on Grieger’s contextual model of the ABC’s of RET. In W. Dryden, & P. Trower (Eds.), Developments in cognitive psychotherapy (pp. 94-99). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  4. Earle, M., & Regin, N. (1980). A world that works for everyone. San Francisco: The EST Enterprise.Google Scholar
  5. Ellis, A. (1962). Reason and emotion in psychotherapy. Secaucus, NJ: Lyle Stuart.Google Scholar
  6. Ellis, A. (1971). Growth through reason. North Hollywood, CA: Wilshire Books.Google Scholar
  7. Ellis, A. (1973). Humanistic psychotherapy: The rational-emotive approach. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  8. Ellis, A. (1976). The biological basis of human irrationality. Journal of Individual Psychology, 32, 145–168.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Ellis, A. (1977). Anger: How to live with and without it. Secaucus, NJ: Citadel Press.Google Scholar
  10. Ellis, A. (1978). Personality characteristics of rational-emotive therapists and other kinds of therapist. Psychotherapy: Theory, research and practice, 15, 329–332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Ellis, A. (1985). Overcoming resistance. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  12. Ellis, A. (1988a). Comments on Grieger’s contextual model of ABC’s of RET. In W. Dryden & P. Tower (Eds.), Developments in cognitive therapy (pp. 100-105). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  13. Ellis, A. (1988b). How to stubbornly refuse to make yourself miserable about anything—Yes anything. Secaucus, NJ: Lyle Stuart.Google Scholar
  14. Ellis, A., & Dryden, W. (1987). The practice of rational-emotive therapy. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  15. Ellis, A., & Grieger, R. (1977). Handbook of rational-emotive therapy: Volume I. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  16. Ellis, A., & Grieger, R. (1986). Handbook of rational-emotive therapy: Volume II. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  17. Ellis, A., & Harper, R. A. (1975). A new guide to rational living. North Hollywood, CA: Wilshire.Google Scholar
  18. Grieger, R. (1985a). From a linear to a contextual model of the ABC’s of RET. Journal of Rational-Emotive Therapy, 3, 75–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Grieger, R. (1985b). The process of rational-emotive therapy. Journal of Rational-Emotive Therapy, 3, 138–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Grieger, R. (1986a). A client’s guide to rational-emotive therapy. Charlottesville, VA.Google Scholar
  21. Grieger, R. (1986b). The role and treatment of irresponsibility in dysfunctional relationships. Journal of Rational-Emotive Therapy, 4, 50–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Grieger, R., & Boyd, J. (1980). Rational-emotive therapy: A skills-base approach. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.Google Scholar
  23. Maultsby, M. C., Jr. (1984). Rational behavior therapy. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  24. Rhinehard, L. (1976). The book of EST. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
  25. Walen, S. R., DiGiuseppe, R. A., & Wessler, R. L. (1980). A practitioner’s guide to rational-emotive therapy. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell M. Grieger
    • 1
  1. 1.CharlottesvilleUSA

Personalised recommendations