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Temperament, Social Skills, and the Communication of Emotion

A Developmental-Interactionist View
  • Ross Buck
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Social skills have been found to be important in the determination of mental health over the life span of the individual, and there is growing evidence of their importance in physical health as well. However, little has been done in the analysis of the origins and causation of social skills. In particular, although it seems clear that temperament and social experience interact in the determination of social skills, there is little coherent theory about the specific aspects of temperament that are important, exactly how they interact with social experience, or the differential importance of the roles that they play in specific circumstances. Also, although it is clear that notions of emotional expression and communication are important to social skills—to the extent that social skills are sometimes measured in terms of emotion communication abilities—there is no detailed theoretical rationale explaining why this is the case.

Keywords

Social Skill Motor Skill Social Competence Emotional Competence Expressive Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ross Buck
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication SciencesUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

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