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Stimulant Medication and the Social Interactions of Hyperactive Children

Effects and Implications
  • Stephen P. Hinshaw
  • James P. McHale
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

In the past decade investigators have begun to emphasize the clinical, prognostic, and theoretical importance of hyperactive children’s social interactions (Barkley, 1982; Campbell & Paulauskas, 1979; Milich & Landau, 1982; Pelham & Bender, 1982; Whalen & Henker, 1985). Indeed, such social and interpersonal phenomena as disruptive interactions in classrooms, aggression against children and adults, noncompliance with parental directions, and disturbed peer relationships are currently considered to be as central to hyperactivity as are the “core” features of inattention, impulsivity, and motor overactivity (Barkley, 1985b; Hinshaw, 1987a; Pelham & Milich, 1984). Indeed, because of their tendencies to elicit undesirable reactions from others, hyperactive children have been characterized as “negative social catalysts” (see Whalen, Henker, Castro, & Granger, 1987a). Furthermore, the deficient social skills and disturbed interpersonal relationships of these children are likely to be implicated in their relatively poor prognoses with respect to adolescent and young adult functioning (Barkley, Fischer, Edelbrock, & Smallish, 1990; Gittelman, Mannuzza, Shenker, & Bonagura, 1985; Satterfield, Hoppe, & Schell, 1982; Weiss, Hechtman, Milroy, & Perlman, 1985). Clearly, no consideration of hyperactivity can ignore the social domain.1

Keywords

Medication Effect Stimulant Medication Attention Deficit Disorder Stimulant Treatment Hyperactive Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen P. Hinshaw
    • 1
  • James P. McHale
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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