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Family Composition, Birth Order, and Gender of Mexican Children in Psychological Treatment

  • Harry W. Martin
  • Maria Eugenia Rangel
  • Sue Keir Hoppe
  • Robert L. Leon
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

This chapter describes the composition of family households of Mexican children and adolescents undergoing psychological treatment, and explores hypotheses relative to the differential selection of Mexican children into treatment. The hypotheses, derived from descriptions of the Mexican family by Diaz-Guerrero (1955) and Ramirez and Parres (1957), focus on three variable characteristics: birth order, gender, and family composition. The hypotheses are explored by using data obtained for other purposes from records of a sample of Mexican children undergoing psychological treatment.

Keywords

Psychological Treatment Birth Order Family Composition Family Household Mexican Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry W. Martin
    • 1
  • Maria Eugenia Rangel
    • 2
  • Sue Keir Hoppe
    • 1
  • Robert L. Leon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.Instituto de Salud Mental de Neuvo LeonMonterry, Nuevo LeonMexico

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