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Post-Column Reactor Determination of Aluminum Concentration in Cyclotron Produced Radiorubidium

  • S. L. Regdos
  • N. R. Simpson
  • H. R. Adams
  • A. C. Mignere
  • R. D. Finn

Abstract

The radiopharmaceutical diagnostic agent krypton-81m (t½= 13 sec) utilized in nuclear medicine for lung ventilation imaging, is produced from the decay of its parent radionuclide rubidium-81 (t½= 4.58 h). Rubidium-81 is adsorbed on a cation exchange resin and krypton-81m is eluted in a stream of humidified air. The radiorubidium can be prepared from the cyclotron bombardment of a krypton gas target via the 82Kr(p,2n)81Rb nuclear reaction. The recovery of the radiorubidium is achieved through dissolution of the moieties deposited on the aluminum target chamber wall surfaces. The amphoteric character of the aluminum can lead to the reduction in loading efficiency of the generator as well as presenting other processing difficulties. The aluminum concentration of the rubidium solution obtained prior to generator loading has been determined by means of a post-column reactor with Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) as the derivatizing reagent. A minimum detection limit, at a wavelength of 310 nm, was determined at 190 ppb for aluminum (III). Concentrations of aluminum (III) in the solute were dependent upon the cyclotron operating parameters with ranges from 200 ppb to 4300 ppb.

Keywords

Ammonium Hydroxide Aluminum Concentration Cation Exchange Resin Minimum Detection Limit High Performance Liquid Chromatog 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. L. Regdos
    • 2
  • N. R. Simpson
    • 1
  • H. R. Adams
    • 1
  • A. C. Mignere
    • 2
  • R. D. Finn
    • 1
  1. 1.Cyclotron Facility, Nuclear Medicine Department, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical CenterNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Chemistry DepartmentUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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