Advertisement

Tantalum-178-Labeled Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis Via the Intermediate Tantalum Pentachloride — A Potential Myocardial Perfusion Agent

  • Warren W. Layne
  • Jeffrey L. Lacy

Abstract

The recent development of an automated 178W/178Ta generator and multiwire gamma camera (MWGC) for first-pass cardiac imaging has demonstrated the practicality of use of the short-lived radioisotope tantalum-178 (178Ta) as a radiotracer for nuclear medicine imaging procedures. 1.2

Keywords

Myocardial Uptake Liver Uptake Reversed Phase Silica Myocardial Perfusion Agent Tantalum Hydroxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Lacy JL, Guidry GW, Layne WW, Verani MS, Roberts R: An automated portable W-178/Ta-178 generator for mobile applications with the multiwire gamma camera. J. Nucl. Med. 31: 855 (1990).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lacy JL, Guidry GW, Verani MS, Layne WW, Roberts R: A portable computerized multiwire gamma camera - performance characteristics in clinical application. J. Nucl. Med. 31: 759 (1990).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in: “Annals of the ICRP” ICRP Publication, Vol. 38, Pergamon Press, New York 804–805, 827 (1983).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lacy JL, Ball ME, Verani MS, Wiles HB, Babich JW, LeBlanc AD, Stabin M, Bolomey L, Roberts R: An improved 178W/178Ta generator system for high volume clinical applications. J. Nucl. Med. 29: 1526–1538 (1988).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Neirinckx RD, Jones AG, David MA, et al: Tantalum-178–a short lived nuclide for nuclear medicine: development of a potential generator system. J. Nucl. Med. 19: 514–519 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Holman BL, Harris GL, Neirinckx RD: Tantalum-178–a short lived nuclide for nuclear medicine: production of the parent W-178. J. Nucl. Med. 19: 510–513 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Lacy JL, Verani MS, Ball ME, Roberts R: Clinical application of a pressurized xenon wire chamber camera utilizing the short lived agent 178Ta. Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A269: 369–376 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Lacy JL, Verani MS, Ball ME, Boyce TM, Gibson RW, Roberts R: First-pass radionuclide angiography using a multiwire gamma camera and tantalum-178. J. Nucl Med. 29: 293–301 (1988).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Adams R, Lacy JL, Ball ME, Martin LJ: The count rate performance of a multiwire gamma camera measured by a decaying source method with 9.3-minute tantalum-178. j. Nucl. Med. 36: 1723–1726 (1990).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Lacy JL, LeBlanc AD, Babich JW, Bungo MW, Latson LA, Lewis RM, Poliner LR, Jones RH, Johnson PC: A gamma camera for medical applications using a multiwire proportional counter. J. Nucl Med. 25: 1003–1012 (1984).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Liu P, Kiess MC, Okada RD, Block PC, Strauss HW, Pohost GM, Boucher CA: The persistent defect on exercise thallium imaging and its fate after myocardial revascularization: does it represent scar or ischemia? Am. Heart J. 110: 996–1001 (1985).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Pohost GM, Okada RD, O’Keefe DD, Gewirtz H, Beller G, Strauss HW, Chaffin JS, Leppo J, Daggett WM: Thallium redistribution in dogs with severe coronary artery stenosis of fixed caliber. Circ. Res. 48: 439–446 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Okada RD, Leppo JA, Strauss HW, Boucher CA, Pohost GM: Mechanisms and time course for the disappearance of thallium-201 defects at rest in dogs. Am. J. Cardiol. 49: 699–706 (1982).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Gibson RS, Watson DD, Taylor GJ, Crosby IK, Wellons HL, Holt ND, Beller GA: Perspective assessment of regional myocardial perfusion before and after coronary revascularization survey by quantitative thallium-201 scintigraphy. J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 1: 804–815 (1983).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Li QS, Solot G, Frank TL, Wagner Jr. HN, Becker LC: Myocardial redistribution of technetium-99m-methoxy-isobutyl isonitrile. J. Nucl. Med. 31: 1069–1076 (1990).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Seldon DW, Johnson LL, Blood DK, Muschel MJ, Smith KF, Wall RM, Cannon PJ: Myocardial perfusion imaging with Technetium-99m SQ30217: comparison with Thallium-201 and coronary anatomy. J. Nucl. Med. 30: 312–319 (1989).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Jones A: Private communication, Harvard University, Boston, Mass.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Holman BL, Campbell CI, Lister-James J, Jones AG, Davison A, Kloner RA: Effect of reperfusion and hyperemia on the myocardial distribution of technetium-99m t-butylisonitrile. J. Nucl. Med. 27: 1172–1177 (1986).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Holman BL, Sporn V, Jones AG, Sia STB, Perez-Balivo N, Davison A, Lister-James J, Kronauge JF, Mitta AEA, Camin LL, Campbell S, Williams SJ, Carpenter AT: Myocardial imaging with technetium-99m CPI: initial experience in the human. J. Nucl. Med. 28: 13–18 (1987).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Taillefer R: How to image 99“Tc-SESTAMIBI in Course Syllabus, Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Council, Soc. Nucl. Med. June 18: 15–24 (1990).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Linder K: Private communication, The Squibb Institute for Medical Research, New Brunswick, New Jersey.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Sands H, Delano ML, Gallager BM: Uptake of hexakis(t-butylisonitrile)technetium(I) and hexakis(isopropyliso- nitrile)technetium(I) by neonatal rat myocytes and human erythrocytes. J. Nucl. Med. 27: 404–408 (1986).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Piwnica-Worms D, Kronauge JF, Holman BL, Lister-James J, Davison A, Jones AG: Hexakis(Carbomethoxyisopropylisonitrile)technetium(I), a new myocardial perfusion imaging agent: Binding characteristics in cultured chick heart cells. J. Nucl. Med. 29: 55–61 (1988).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Maublant JC, Gachon P, Moins N: Hexakis (2-methoxylisobutylisonitrile) technetium-99m and thallium-201 chloride: uptake and release in cultured myocardial cells. J. Nucl. Med. 29: 48–54 (1988).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Lewis DF, Fay RC: Preparation, characterization, and the crystal and molecular structure of two salts containing the eight-coordinate Tetrakis(N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamato)tantalum(V) cation. J. Inorg. Chem. 15 (9): 2219–2225 (1976).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Weir JR, Fay RC: Stereochemistry and metal-centered rearrangements of eight-coordinate niobium(V) and tantalum(V)dithiocarbamates and monothiocarbamates. Inorg. Chem. 25: 2969–2976 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Muetterties EL, Wright CM: Chelate chemistry III. Chelates of high coordination number. J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 87(21):47064717 (1965).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Gibalo IM: “Analytical Chemistry of the Elements, Niobium and Tantalum”. A. P. Vinogradov,ed. Ann Arbor-Humphrey Science Publisher, Ann Arbor, MI (1970).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Davis AR, Einstein FWB: Factors affecting the shape of eight-coordinate species. Crystal and molecular structure of (NbT4)2(O(H…Cl)3.CH3CN. Inorg. Chem. 14 (12): 3030–3035 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Kung HF, Liu B, Mankoff D, Kung MP, Billings J, Francesconi L, Alavi A: A new myocardial perfusion agent for PET:[Ga68]BAT-TECH. J. Nucl. Med. 31 (5): 727 (1990).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Fairbrother F: “The Chemistry of Niobium and Tantalum”. Elsevier Publishing Co., New York, N.Y. 86–88 (1967).Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Bagnall KW, Brown D: Some chloro-complexes of quinquevalent protactinium, niobium and tantalum. J. Chem. Soc. 3021–3025 (1964).Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Babko AK, Lukachina W, Nabivanets BI: Solubility and acid base properties of tantalum and niobium hydroxides. Russian J. Inora. Chem. 8 (8): 957–961 (1963).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Warren W. Layne
    • 1
  • Jeffrey L. Lacy
    • 1
  1. 1.Baylor College of MedicineMethodist HospitalHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations