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Parent and Family Training

  • Karen S. Budd
  • Pamela L. Fabry
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Professionals who work with handicapped children and their families appear to share an implicit assumption that strengthening the family is an important part of habilitation (Simeonsson & Simeonsson, 1981). This assumption is based on a recognition that, even in families of healthy, well-functioning children, child rearing is a challenging and stressful process. For families with a handicapped child, the problems associated with child rearing are magnified. Not all families of handicapped children want or need professional help, and for us to presume otherwise is to ignore the enormous variability among individuals. However, for many of these families, the demands of caretaking call for increased knowledge, resources, and support. Thus the question for professionals frequently is not if but rather how best to assist families in dealing with the specialized situation created by a handicapped child.

Keywords

Behavior Problem Parent Training Target Behavior Handicapped Child Behavioral Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen S. Budd
    • 1
  • Pamela L. Fabry
    • 1
  1. 1.Meyer Children’s Rehabilitation InstituteUniversity of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA

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