Strategies for Evaluating Treatment Effectiveness

  • Rowland P. Barrett
  • Patrick K. Ackles
  • Michel Hersen
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Beginning with the preface to this volume and continuing throughout the majority of its chapters, a heavy emphasis has been placed on the concept of empiricism and its role in the determination of treatment effectiveness. Simply put, the empirical model involves a quantifiable or data-based approach to clinical decision making that is heavily weighted by objective observation and yields information that is verifiable through replication. It is unfortunate that within many of the professional disciplines that serve mentally retarded clients, such as psychology, psychiatry, and special education, the empirical model is equated strictly with research and, all too often, is dismissed from its potentially valuable contribution to clinical practice, in general.

Keywords

Problem Behavior Target Behavior Behavioral Assessment Apply Behavior Analysis Design Format 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rowland P. Barrett
    • 1
  • Patrick K. Ackles
    • 2
  • Michel Hersen
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorBrown University Program in Medicine, Emma Pendleton Bradley HospitalEast ProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Illinois Institute for the Study of Developmental DisabilitiesUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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