Behavior Modification

Reinforcement
  • Barbara Hawk
  • Stephen R. Schroeder
  • Carolyn S. Schroeder
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Intervention procedures based upon reinforcement have been successfully used to modify behavior of mentally retarded persons across many populations, settings, and target behaviors (Schroeder, Mulick, & Schroeder, 1979; Whitman & Scibak, 1979). Reinforcement approaches are particularly salient with severely and profoundly retarded people because of the critical importance of changing dangerous and/or mal-adaptive behavior patterns. This is paired with a growing desire on the part of many agencies, institutions, and parent advocate groups to use nonpunitive methods of behavior modification whenever possible.

Keywords

Positive Reinforcement Target Behavior Apply Behavior Analysis Negative Reinforcement Differential Reinforcement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Hawk
    • 1
  • Stephen R. Schroeder
    • 1
  • Carolyn S. Schroeder
    • 1
  1. 1.Biological Sciences Research CenterUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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