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Violent Crime: Assault, Rape, Robbery

  • Stuart Palmer
  • John A. Humphrey

Abstract

In addition to criminal homicide, the main forms of serious violent crime are aggravated assault, forcible rape, and robbery. Technically, assault refers to placing another in fear of bodily harm. Battery designates the actual process of bringing about injury of another person. Thus the phrase, Assault and battery. Aggravated assault is the common term for serious, felonious assault and battery. Minor assaults are misdemeanors and are not emphasized here. Generally speaking, aggravated assault is said to occur when at least one of the following criteria is met: the assailant intended to commit a more serious crime such as murder or rape, a deadly weapon was used, or severe bodily injury resulted. Attacks on police officers are usually designated as aggravated assault even if none of these criteria is met.

Keywords

Violent Crime Family Violence Property Crime Relative Deprivation Spousal Violence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Palmer
    • 1
  • John A. Humphrey
    • 2
  1. 1.University of New HampshireDurhamUSA
  2. 2.University of North CarolinaGreensboroUSA

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