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Explanations of Deviance

  • Stuart Palmer
  • John A. Humphrey

Abstract

This chapter discusses four main types of explanations or theories of deviant behavior. These four types—social integration, cultural support, social disorganization and conflict, and societal reaction—are used throughout the book to analyze the various forms of deviance. The chapters that follow clarify why the given types of explanation are or are not especially useful in understanding a specific form of deviant behavior. How certain of these theories can be modified or extended to explain deviance more fully is discussed. Further, there is emphasis on how the theories can in some instances be combined and synthesized to increase their explanatory power.

Keywords

Social Integration Deviant Behavior Social Disorganization Differential Association Positive Deviance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Palmer
    • 1
  • John A. Humphrey
    • 2
  1. 1.University of New HampshireDurhamUSA
  2. 2.University of North CarolinaGreensboroUSA

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