Alcoholism and Drug Use

  • Stuart Palmer
  • John A. Humphrey

Abstract

Billions of people around the world drink alcoholic beverages of one type or another. For most, drinking does not constitute a problem. What are the criteria for alcoholism or, as some professionals prefer, “problem drinking?” Robert Straus argues that problem drinking is the broader term and includes alcoholism. He defines as problem drinkers persons who repeatedly use alcohol in amounts greater than “customary dietary use or prevailing socially acceptable customs”; or in amounts that lead to health problems, interfere with everyday relationships with others, or hamper fulfilling family, economic, and community expectations.1 The core of this definition has to do with use that is excessive in terms of prevailing customs or injuries to health or disruption of role relationships.

Keywords

Illicit Drug Heavy Drinking Problem Drinking Social Disorganization Culture Conflict 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Palmer
    • 1
  • John A. Humphrey
    • 2
  1. 1.University of New HampshireDurhamUSA
  2. 2.University of North CarolinaGreensboroUSA

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