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The Reovirus Particle

  • Wolfgang K. Joklik
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

The term reovirus (the prefix reo- being an acronym of respiratory enteric orphan, that is, not associated with any human disease) was proposed by Sabin (1959) as the group name for a number of related viruses that had been isolated in the 1950s. This was an extremely active period for virus isolation: tissue-culture methods permissive for virus growth in vitro were being developed rapidly, and under the influence of efforts to develop mass vaccination against poliomyelitis, interest in enteric viruses was intense. Many cytopathogenic agents that were neither poliovirus nor coxsackie virus were isolated from the alimentary tracts, not only of patients with mild febrile illness and diarrhea but also of healthy individuals (Robbins et al., 1951; Ramos-Alvarez and Sabin, 1954). Most of these agents possessed rather similar properties and were therefore lumped together under the acronym echovirus (enteric cytopathogenic human orphan); these viruses are now classified as members of the Enterovirus genus of the Picornaviridae family. Some isolates, however, while meeting the original and appropriately loose definition of echoviruses, were different: they were much larger and produced different cytopathic effects. These were the viruses for which Sabin proposed to term reovirus. While morphologically identical, they could be subdivided into three serological subgroups or serotypes: the original echovirus 10 became the Lang strain of reovirus serotype 1, the D5 Jones strain became the prototype of reovirus serotype 2, and the Dearing strain became the prototype of reovirus serotype 3.

Keywords

Virus Particle Minus Strand Reovirus Type Avian Reovirus Defective Interfere Particle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang K. Joklik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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