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The Child Health Care Professional’s Relationship to Psychological Testing

  • Stewart Gabel
  • Gerald D. Oster
  • Steven M. Butnik

Abstract

Exactly how much physicians and other child health care professionals must know about psychological testing and psychological tests depends on the role that the particular health care provider serves in providing services to children with learning and behavior problems. For physicians and other health care providers, this role has expanded considerably in the recent past.1

Keywords

Behavior Problem Health Care Provider Psychological Test Primary Health Care Provider Primary Health Care Clinician 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stewart Gabel
    • 1
  • Gerald D. Oster
    • 2
  • Steven M. Butnik
    • 3
  1. 1.New York Hospital-Cornell Medical CenterWhite PlainsUSA
  2. 2.Regional Institute for Children and Adolescents (RICA)RockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Independent PracticeRichmondUSA

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