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The Child Health Professional Talks to Parents

The Informing Interview
  • Stewart Gabel
  • Gerald D. Oster
  • Steven M. Butnik

Abstract

Parents may sometimes ask physicians and other child health care providers to obtain for their children’s medical records the results of psychological tests performed in school or in a mental health clinic. At times the parents may want the clinician to explain the testing to them because they did not understand the initial interpretation when it was given or because they were too anxious to “hear” all that was said at that time. They may also want the physician to coordinate his or her services with those of the school or mental health provider.

Keywords

Behavior Problem Mental Retardation Psychological Testing Handicapped Child Inform Interview 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stewart Gabel
    • 1
  • Gerald D. Oster
    • 2
  • Steven M. Butnik
    • 3
  1. 1.New York Hospital-Cornell Medical CenterWhite PlainsUSA
  2. 2.Regional Institute for Children and Adolescents (RICA)RockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Independent PracticeRichmondUSA

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