Effectiveness of a Perinatal High-Risk Follow-Up Program in the Early Identification of Cerebral Palsy

  • Margaret Cox
  • Ann Johnson
  • Edna McKim
  • Gourdas Pal
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Developmental Psychobiology book series (TDP)

Abstract

Newfoundland is the most easterly of Canada’s Atlantic provinces, with a population of 500,000 scattered over an island 500 mi across, and even more sparsely over the large mainland section of Labrador. The area was settled 400 years ago predominantly by English and Irish emigrants who joined the native Inuit and Indian populations. The province’s birth rate and family size formerly was the highest in Canada, and remains high (average family size is still 3.8 persons). Family ties are strong in New-foundland, and the divorce rate is low. The perinatal mortality rate, previously considerably higher than the Canadian average, has declined to 11.5 per 1,000 births, as compared with 10.9 for Canada as a whole (Statistics Canada, 1983).

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Divorce Rate Severe Hearing Loss Average Family Size Severe Visual Impairment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Griffiths, R. (1976). Griffiths Mental Development Scales. Amershan Bucks, U.K.: Eden House.Google Scholar
  2. Health statistics. (1980). Newfoundland: Department of Health Statistics.Google Scholar
  3. Statistics Canada. (1983, February). Births and deaths. Ottawa: Health Division, 1.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Cox
    • 1
  • Ann Johnson
    • 1
  • Edna McKim
    • 1
  • Gourdas Pal
    • 2
  1. 1.Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Perinatal ProgramSt. John’sCanada
  2. 2.Children’s Rehabilitation CenterSt. John’sCanada

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