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Behavioral Risk

An Ecological Perspective on Classifying Children as Behaviorally Maladjusted in Kindergarten
  • David H. Cooper
  • Dale C. Farran
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Developmental Psychobiology book series (TDP)

Abstract

At school entry, generally in kindergarten, children join a milieu that holds behavioral expectations to which they must adjust. Failure in this regard may result in referral to special education classes, retention, or simply a stressful year for the maladjusted child and the teacher. In the case of referral or retention, the teacher’s professional judgment is given considerable weight in classifying the child for purposes of educational placement.

Keywords

School District Behavioral Risk Interpersonal Skill School Entry Behavioral Rating 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • David H. Cooper
    • 1
  • Dale C. Farran
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Special EducationUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.Center for the Development of Early EducationKamehameha Schools/Bishop EstateHonoluluUSA

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