Alcohol

Cultural Conceptions and Social Behavior among Urban Blacks
  • Atwood D. Gaines

Abstract

A concern with beverage alcohol in black society has a long history. Frederick Douglass (1892) saw alcohol as a means masters used to control their slaves during holiday seasons, although Genovese, in his Roll, Jordan, Roll (1976) notes that slaves were also concerned about drunkenness in their masters. After emancipation, historians note, whiskey was often served at social events in order to manipulate the black vote in the South (Franklin, 1974). Alcohol seems also to have served as a device for keeping Blacks in their proverbial Southern place (Lee, 1944) and Southern prohibitionists tried to use the weak support for prohibition among Blacks as a cause for disenfranchisement (Walton, 1970; Wharton, 1947). Such attempts recall earlier Southern efforts to deny rights of state residency if an emancipated slave used alcohol (Guild, 1939). Some contemporary authors continue to suggest that alcohol, alcoholism, and arrests for alcohol-related behaviors are still some means employed by a “White” establishment to control “Blacks” (see Staples, 1976).1

Keywords

Beverage Alcohol Alcohol Problem African Ancestry Ethnographic Research Cultural Conception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atwood D. Gaines
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and Department of PsychiatryCase Western Reserve University and Medical SchoolClevelandUSA

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