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Shyness pp 63-80 | Cite as

Genetics and Shyness

  • Robert Plomin
  • Denise Daniels
Part of the Emotions, Personality, and Psychotherapy book series (EPPS)

Abstract

Heredity plays a larger role in shyness than in other personality traits in infancy (Plomin & Rowe, 1979), early childhood (Plomin & Rowe, 1977), middle childhood (O’Connor, Foch, Sherry, & Plomin, 1980), adolescence (Cheek & Zonderman, 1983), and adulthood (Horn, Plomin, & Rosenman, 1976). The purpose of this chapter is to review evidence concerning the etiology of individual differences in shyness and to consider conceptual and clinical implications of findings that indicate genetic influence.

Keywords

Twin Study Biological Mother Adoptive Parent Adoptive Family Family Environment Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Plomin
    • 1
  • Denise Daniels
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Behavioral GeneticsUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA

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