Shyness pp 173-185 | Cite as

Analyzing Shyness

A Specific Application of Broader Self-Regulatory Principles
  • Charles S. Carver
  • Michael F. Scheier
Part of the Emotions, Personality, and Psychotherapy book series (EPPS)

Abstract

We have been interested in processes by which people carry out their intentions successfully, and processes by which those efforts are disrupted. Unlike most theorists represented in this volume, we do not focus specifically on shyness as the primary object of our analysis. Our viewpoint is broader, an attempt to point out principles common to many different circumstances in behavioral self-regulation, principles that may account for patterns of successful and disrupted functioning across a wide range of domains.

Keywords

Social Anxiety Discrepancy Reduction Test Anxiety Experimental Social Psychology Perceptual Input 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles S. Carver
    • 1
  • Michael F. Scheier
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MiamiCoral GablesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCarnegie-Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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