Communicating with Responsive Intelligent Membranes

  • A. Mirmohseni
  • W. E. Price
  • C. J. Small
  • C. O. Too
  • G. G. Wallace
  • H. Zhao

Abstract

At present, membrane technology is being applied in a wide range of industries from food and chemical processing to biotechnology and waste management. The current (1995) global market has been estimated1 to be in excess of US$6–9 billion; of which 30% is attributed to membrane materials alone. These traditional membrane products are quite sophisticated. For example, polysulfone asymmetric membranes2 have a dense thin skin side that is supported by a more porous open structure; thus high selectivity can be achieved without sacrificing high flux.

Keywords

Membrane Material Manganese Dioxide Receiver Side Selectivity Factor Source Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Mirmohseni
    • 1
  • W. E. Price
    • 1
  • C. J. Small
    • 1
  • C. O. Too
    • 1
  • G. G. Wallace
    • 1
  • H. Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.Intelligent Polymer Research Laboratory, Chemistry DepartmentUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia

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