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Biodegradable Polymer Blends

  • Mohammed Yasin
  • Allan J. Amass
  • Brian J. Tighe

Abstract

Several microbially produced or chemically synthesised polyesters are currently available commercially. Polyesters are finding use as biodegradable material not only because the chemical synthesis is simple, but also due to the fact that the raw materials are cheap, the ester group is easily hydrolysable, the rate of degradation is good and non-toxic products are formed. Microbially produced polyesters have unique characteristics which can be utilised to modulate price and performance. Their many useful and interesting properties can be extended and exploited by blending with synthetic polymers, which can allow both the performance and price of the material to be adjusted. Currently, there is great interest and awareness in ‘environmentally friendly’ packaging, brought on by either constantly updated legislation, or through environmental conscience. Our work on developing materials for such applications, is concerned with two aims; the scientific interest in the study of the factors affecting compatibility of polymer blends and the subsequent properties of these materials, particularly their degradation properties, and the importance of producing biodegradable materials that are economically viable 1, 2.

Keywords

Activate Sludge Hydrolytic Degradation Biodegradable Material Weight Average Molecular Weight Cellulose Acetate Butyrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammed Yasin
    • 1
  • Allan J. Amass
    • 1
  • Brian J. Tighe
    • 1
  1. 1.Biodegradable Polymers Unit, Speciality Materials Research Group, Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied ChemistryAston UniversityBirminghamUK

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