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Everyday Disturbances of Speech

  • George F. Mahl
Part of the Emotions, Personality, and Psychotherapy book series (EPPS)

Abstract

This chapter concerns one of the extralinguistic dimensions of speech, the “roughness” or “influency” or “normal disturbances” in word-word progression.

Keywords

Test Anxiety Spontaneous Speech Anxiety Rating Verbal Content Speech Disturbance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • George F. Mahl
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and PsychologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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