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Content-Category Analysis

The Measurement of the Magnitude of Psychological Dimensions in Psychotherapy
  • Louis A. Gottschalk
Part of the Emotions, Personality, and Psychotherapy book series (EPPS)

Abstract

The general problem with which the content-analysis procedure developed by Gottschalk and his associates deals is the accurate measurement of psychological states or traits, a problem of equal consequence to psychiatrists, psychologists, behavioral and social scientists.

Keywords

Psychological State Anxiety Score Speech Sample Content Category Death Anxiety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louis A. Gottschalk
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, College of MedicineUniversity of California at IrvineIrvineUSA

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