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Possible Roles of Inositol Phospholipids in Cell Surface Signal Transduction in Neuronal Tissues

  • Y. Nishizuka
  • U. Kikkawa
  • A. Kishimoto
  • H. Nakanishi
  • K. Nishiyama
Conference paper
Part of the FIDIA Research Series book series (FIDIA, volume 4)

Abstract

Information of various extracellular signals such as a group of neurotransmitters and some peptide hormones flows from the cell surface into the cell interior through two routes, Ca2+ mobilization and protein kinase C activation. Except some tissues such as bovine adrenal medullary cells (Swilem and Hawthorne, 1983), both routes become available as the result of a single ligand-receptor interaction as well as of depolarization. Under normal conditions this protein kinase is activated by diacylglycerol in the presence of membrane phospholipids, particularly PtdSer, at a physiologically low concentration of Ca2+ (Nishizuka, 1984a, b). The diacylglycerol active in this role is usually absent from the membrane, but is produced from the receptor-mediated or voltage-dependent hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids as shown in Figure 1. Although it is becoming clear that PtdIns(4, 5)P 2 is the prime target of phosphodiesterase, other inositol phospholipids are probably broken down at different rates. On the other hand, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP 3), a water-soluble product of PtdIns(4, 5)P 2 hydrolysis, has been proposed to serve as an intracellular mediator of Ca2+ mobilization from its internal store (Berridge and Irving, 1984).

Keywords

Myelin Basic Protein Phorbol Ester Phorbol Myristate Acetate Inositol Trisphosphate Inositol Phospholipid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Nishizuka
    • 1
  • U. Kikkawa
    • 1
  • A. Kishimoto
    • 1
  • H. Nakanishi
    • 1
  • K. Nishiyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryKobe University School of MedicineKobe 650Japan

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