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Relationships between Acetylcholine Release and Membrane Phosphatidylcholine Turnover in Brain and in Cultured Cholinergic Neurons

  • Jan Krzysztof Blusztajn
  • Pamela G. Holbrook
  • Michael Lakher
  • Mordechai Liscovitch
  • Jean-Claude Maire
  • Charlotte Mauron
  • U. Ingrid Richardson
  • Mariateresa Tacconi
  • Richard J. Wurtman
Part of the FIDIA Research Series book series (FIDIA, volume 4)

Abstract

Cholinergic neurons derive their choline from the circulation (choline crosses the blood-brain-barrier via a facilitated diffusion mechanism, Pardridge et al., 1979) or from its synthesis in situ (Blusztajn and Wurtman, 1981). Within cholinergic neurons choline can undergo two transformations: it may be acetylated by choline acetyltransferase (CAT) to form the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), or it may be incorporated into choline phospholipids (Ch-PL), PtdCho, sphingomyelin, or plasmalogens via the CDP-choline (Kennedy and Weiss, 1956) or base-exchange (Porcellati et al., 1971; Abdel-Latif and Smith, 1972) pathways. We hypothesize that a dynamic equilibrium exists between choline’s reversible fluxes into and out of ACh and Ch-PL, and that these fluxes are well regulated in order to maintain both adequate ACh synthesis and the functional integrity of membranes (Ch-PL are the major lipid components of all biological membranes). This chapter describes the relationships between choline, ACh, and Ch-PL in the nervous system, and discusses evidence derived from experiments on brain slices, synaptosomes, and cultured cells.

Keywords

Cholinergic Neuron Choline Kinase Free Choline Fatty Acyl Composition Choline Phospholipid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Krzysztof Blusztajn
    • 1
  • Pamela G. Holbrook
    • 1
  • Michael Lakher
    • 1
  • Mordechai Liscovitch
    • 1
  • Jean-Claude Maire
    • 2
  • Charlotte Mauron
    • 1
  • U. Ingrid Richardson
    • 1
  • Mariateresa Tacconi
    • 3
  • Richard J. Wurtman
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Neural and Endocrine Regulation, Department of Applied Biological SciencesMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Department de PharmacologieCentre Medical UniversitaireGenevaSwitzerland
  3. 3.Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario NegriMilanoItaly

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