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Health Behavior Research and Social Work

  • Rona L. Levy

Abstract

The distinctiveness of social work in health care settings is that people served are clients rather than patients; that the focus of work is on the social effects of illness, not illness; that problem formulation and intervention rests on clear understanding of social cause, social manifestation, and social intervention as group phenomena. (Falck, 1984, p. 167)

Keywords

Health Behavior Social Work Behavioral Medicine Clinical Social Work Social Work Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rona L. Levy
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social WorkUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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