Health Behavior Research and School and Youth Health Promotion

  • Steven H. Kelder
  • Elizabeth W. Edmundson
  • Leslie A. Lytle

Abstract

Adolescents are frequently considered among the healthiest of all Americans, with nearly the lowest mortality rate of all age groups (Coira, Zill, & Bloom, 1994). They also have morbidity rates for chronic medical and psychiatric disorders that are low in comparison to those in the adult population (Gans, 1990). A closer look reveals that morbidity and mortality rates do not adequately portray the health status of most adolescents. A far greater number of American adolescents are threatened by what has been called “social morbidities,” which include unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, homicide, suicide, injuries related to violence, and substance abuse. Adolescents also may develop unhealthful and persistent behavior patterns such as poor dietary intake, low levels of physical activity, and tobacco use. These social morbidities and unhealthful behavior patterns not only threaten adolescents’ current physical health status, but also are linked throughout the life span to adult chronic diseases and ultimately to adult mortality.

Keywords

Physical Activity Sexuality Education School Health School Food Sexuality Education Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven H. Kelder
    • 1
  • Elizabeth W. Edmundson
    • 2
  • Leslie A. Lytle
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Public HealthUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Kinesiology and Health EducationUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  3. 3.Division of Epidemiology, School of Public HealthUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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