Human Exposure

  • Geoffrey G. Eichholz
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 35)

Abstract

Human exposure to radon results from several sources. Those exposures due to technologically enhanced causes such as mining and milling activities will be discussed first and indoor air exposures last.

Keywords

Radon Concentration Ventilation Rate Work Level 222Rn Concentration Radon Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey G. Eichholz
    • 1
  1. 1.Nuclear Engineering and Health Physics ProgramGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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