Mössbauer Spectrometers and Calibration

  • T. E. Cranshaw
Chapter
Part of the Modern Inorganic Chemistry book series (MICE, volume 1)

Abstract

A Mössbauer spectrum is a record of the rate of resonant interactions taking place in the specimen as a function of energy. The occurrence of the interactions may be detected by the absorption of γ rays from the beam, in which case we have a transmission spectrum, or by the detection of the decay products, such as γ rays, x rays, or conversion electrons of the excited nucleus, in which case we have a “backscatter” spectrum. A Mössbauer spectrometer is an instrument for obtaining the spectra.

Keywords

Auger Electron Velocity Scale Conversion Electron Servo System Mossbauer Spectrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. E. Cranshaw
    • 1
  1. 1.Nuclear Physics DivisionAtomic Energy Research EstablishmentHarwell, Didcot, OxfordshireEngland

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