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General Guidelines and Principles

  • Robert P. Liberman
  • Eugenie G. Wheeler
  • Louis A. J. M. de Visser
  • Julie Kuehnel
  • Timothy Kuehnel
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the empirical and theoretical background and general guidelines for the social learning approach to marital therapy described in this manual. This bird’s-eye view is important for two reasons. First, it provides a conceptual framework for understanding the various therapy techniques. Second, a grasp of the underlying theoretical principles, basic assumptions, and their empirical support will be helpful in guiding the therapist when unanticipated problems occur.

Keywords

Married Couple Marital Satisfaction General Guideline Marital Conflict Homework Assignment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert P. Liberman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eugenie G. Wheeler
    • 3
  • Louis A. J. M. de Visser
    • 4
    • 5
  • Julie Kuehnel
    • 1
    • 6
  • Timothy Kuehnel
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Camarillo State HospitalCamarilloUSA
  3. 3.Oxnard Community Mental Health CenterOxnardUSA
  4. 4.Loyola-Marymount UniversityLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Santa Clara High SchoolOxnardUSA
  6. 6.California Lutheran CollegeThousand OaksUSA

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