Development of the Father-Infant Relationship

  • Michael W. Yogman

Abstract

Until recently, our theories and empirical studies of infant social development largely ignored the father. The father’s role with young infants was considered to be mainly indirect, supporting the mother, who was biologically adapted to be the infant’s caregiver. This chapter will review recent studies that suggest that the father’s role with young infants is far less biologically constrained than once thought. In what way biologically based sex differences constrain the social interactions of fathers with their infants must await future research, but such constraints now seem far more subtle than once believed. Wide variability in the behavior and roles of the two parents challenges many of the stereotypes of the father as incompetent or uninvolved with the infant and leaves ample opportunity for wide variations in the way parents and their infants relate to each other.

Keywords

Young Infant Father Involvement Infant Behavior Attachment Behavior Paternal Involvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael W. Yogman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Child Development UnitChildren’s Hospital Medical CenterBostonUSA

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