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The Role of Physical Appearance in Infant and Child Development

  • Katherine A. Hildebrandt

Abstract

Physical appearance cues convey much information about another person during a social encounter. Not only are such characteristics as gender, age, attractiveness, and body type immediately obvious, but knowledge of these characteristics may elicit a host of assumptions about the person’s personality characteristics and expected behavior patterns. Recent social psychological research (Adams, 1977; Berscheid & Walster, 1974) attests to the salience and power of physical appearance in social interactions among adults. Our society’s preoccupation with physical appearance, as reflected by the cosmetic, diet, and fashion industries, also points to the significance of this variable in everyday life.

Keywords

Physical Appearance Cleft Palate Physical Attractiveness Body Type Facial Attractiveness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine A. Hildebrandt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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