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The Allocation and Acquisition of Resources in Times of Scarcity

  • Andre de Carufel
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

If current projections are correct, societies like our own, which are based on highly complex technology and rapid rates of energy consumption, may be forced to endure some degree of scarcity in resources that are central to our way of life. These projected conditions of scarcity imply that at least some individuals in these societies will experience a sense of deprivation in these areas. The focus of the first section of this paper is on the origin and forms of this scarcity-based deprivation and on an examination of its potential behavioral consequences. Subsequently, suggestions are offered concerning the potential effects of scarcity on the person who occupies the position of resource allocator. In these sections, no attempt is made to provide exhaustive reviews of the literature. Several excellent sourcebooks in these areas have recently been published (e.g., Berkowitz & Walster, 1976; Crosby, 1976; Walster, Walster, & Berscheid, 1978; Lerner, 1977). Instead, the focus is pointing to gaps in this literature, on making suggestions as to future research directions, and on commenting on existing research traditions.

Keywords

Collective Action Scarce Resource Procedural Justice Relative Deprivation Outcome Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andre de Carufel
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OttawaOntarioCanada

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