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The Changing Longevity of Heterosexual Close Relationships

A Commentary and Forecast
  • Ellen Berscheid
  • Bruce Campbell
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

These are, indeed, “hard times for lovers” as the contemporary song proclaims. The chance of an adult heterosexual close relationship (CR) surviving “until death do us part” is slimmer than ever before. The rate of marital dissolution in the United States has reached an all time high (Levinger & Moles, 1976; Norton & Glick, 1976), and the current rate of dissolution among relatively high-commitment nonmarital CRs (e.g., cohabitation) is even higher (see Glick & Norton, 1977; Macklin, 1972). Approximately 40% of all current and potential marriages among women now in their late 20s may eventually end in divorce, according to Glick and Norton’s (1978) estimates derived from the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey for June 1975.

Keywords

Social Change Positive Emotion Divorce Rate Marital Dissolution Economic Independence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ellen Berscheid
    • 1
  • Bruce Campbell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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