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Chloride Fluxes in the Erythroblastic Leukemic Cell: An Example of Membrane Differentiation

  • H. G. Hempling
  • S. White

Abstract

The erythroblastic leukemic cell from the Long-Evans rat has been used in our laboratory as a model of the immature component of the erythroid line (Wise, '74; Hempling and Wise,'75; Wise,'76). We have used this cell line to determine which membrane functions found in the mature erythrocyte are already present in the immature stage and which membrane functions present in the immature stage disappear when the cells lose their nuclei and mature. It was found (Hempling and Wise,'75) that the rapid permeability of the membrane to water and to urea, so distinctive for the membrane of the mature erythrocyte, was characteristic of the erythroblastic leukemic cell also. In contrast, Wise found (Wise,'76) that the membrane of the immature erythroblastic leukemic cell possessed three mediated pathways for the transport of neutral amino acids which were dependent on external Na+. On the other hand, the rat reticulocyte lost one mediated pathway, while the mature erythrocyte lost all three.

Keywords

Rate Coefficient Membrane Function Sulfate Transport Chloride Transport Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cell 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. G. Hempling
    • 1
  • S. White
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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