Neural Plasticity and Feminine Sexual Behavior in the Rat

  • Lynwood G. Clemens

Abstract

Female mating behavior in the rat is normally under the control of estrogen and progesterone. These ovarian hormones act upon the brain to bring about sexual receptivity. One concept often used to explain how these hormones facilitate mating behavior suggests that lordosis is under some form of tonic neural inhibition and that estrogen and progesterone decrease this inhibition. Since an inhibitory concept is only one of several alternative explanations, and since there is considerable evidence that contradicts an inhibition hypothesis in its general form, it is instructive to review the “crucial” studies for this concept before trying to outline alternative interpretations and hypotheses. In this endeavor I will restrict my comments to the laboratory rat.

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Sexual Receptivity Neural Plasticity Septal Lesion Gonadal Hormone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynwood G. Clemens
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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