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The Comparative Method in Studies of Reproductive Behavior

  • Donald A. Dewsbury

Abstract

In “The Snark was a Boojum,” Frank Beach did a masterful job of providing a retrospective view of the utilization of the comparative method in psychology. Over the course of this century, psychologists had come to concentrate their efforts on a few species of mammals, especially albino rats. Beach uttered a plea for increased utilization of the comparative method in the study of an increased variety of behavioral patterns. Since publication of the “Snark” paper in 1950, albino rats have remained the animals of choice for the vast majority of experiments. However, the Comparative Psychologist has yet to suddenly and softly vanish away. Beach was correct in his perception of the advantages of the comparative method. It is indeed a method possessing enormous power in the approach to a broad range of behavioral questions. That the Comparative Psychologist is still on the scene as in part attributable to “The Snark was a Boojum,” a paper that has had a major influence on the decisions of a considerable number of behavioral scientists to pursue comparative study.

Keywords

House Mouse Comparative Psychology Prairie Vole Meadow Vole Copulatory Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald A. Dewsbury
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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