Conceptual and Neural Mechanisms of Masculine Copulatory Behavior

  • Benjamin D. Sachs

Abstract

This chapter deals with the conceptualization of masculine copulatory behavior in mammals, and with the search for the neural basis of this behavior. My thesis, in part, is that the search for the central neural control of sexual behavior has not led to the dicoveries and sense of understanding that many expected when the search began. The relatively slow rate of progress stems partly from the apparent complexity of the neural control, and from the technical difficulties in tracing that control. The difficulties in understanding the neural control might have been more easily anticipated, though perhaps not avoided, had there been greater concurrent conceptual analysis of the behavior patterns.

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Olfactory Bulb Copulatory Behavior Medial Forebrain Bundle Stria Terminalis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin D. Sachs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

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