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What Is Madness?

The Scientific Study of Mental Disorders
  • Martin Goldstein
  • Inge Goldstein

Abstract

The words psychology and psychiatry are derived from the Greek word for “soul.” The fields described by these words are those in which we attempt to study scientifically the most intimate and characteristic aspects of being human—how we feel, how we think, and how what we feel and think are expressed in what we do.

Keywords

Mental Disorder Depressive Disorder Identical Twin Mental Hospital Fraternal Twin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

  1. Alexander, Franz Gabriel, and Sheldon T. Selesnick. The History of Psychiatry: An Evaluation of Psychiatric Thought and Practice from Prehistoric Times to the Present. New York: Harper and Row, 1966.Google Scholar
  2. Goshen, Charles Ernest, ed. Documentary History of Psychiatry: A Source Book on Historical Principles. New York: Philosophical Library, 1967.Google Scholar
  3. Kaplan, Bert, ed. The Inner World of Mental Illness: A Series of First Person Accounts of What It Was Like. New York: Harper and Row, 1964.Google Scholar
  4. Rosen, George, Madness in Society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968.Google Scholar
  5. Snyder, Solomon H. Madness and the Brain. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975.Google Scholar
  6. Wender, Paul H., and Donald F. Klein. Mind, Mood, and Medicine: A Guide to the New Biopsychiatry. New York: New American Library, 1982.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Goldstein
    • 1
  • Inge Goldstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Yeshiva UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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