Mathematics

  • Martin Goldstein
  • Inge Goldstein

Abstract

As indicated in Chapter 3, logic is concerned with making valid inferences from a limited set of starting premises. The premises themselves are statements about certain entities—heroes, Virginians, mammals, football players, and so on—and relations between these entities. Any set of premises is associated with a particular subject matter; for example, the premises about mammals and goldfish are associated with a particular problem in biological classification.

Keywords

Prime Number Logical Consequence Plane Geometry Football Player Mathematical System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference Notes

  1. 1.
    Martin E. Hellman, “The Mathematics of Public Key Cryptography,” Scientific American, August 1979, pp. 146-157.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Euler’s article is reprinted in Scientific American, Mathematics in the Modern World: Readings from Scientific American (San Francisco: W. H. Freeman, 1968).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Eric T. Bell, Men of Mathematics (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1937).Google Scholar

Suggested Reading

  1. Gardner, Martin. Martin Gardner’s New Mathematical Diversions from Scientific American. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1966.Google Scholar
  2. Gardner, Martin. Mathematical Magic Show: More Puzzles, Games, Diversions, Illusions and Other Mathematical Sleight-of-Mind from Scientific American. New York: Vintage, 1977.Google Scholar
  3. Gardner, Martin. Aha! Insight. New York: Scientific American/W. H. Freeman, 1978.Google Scholar
  4. Jacobs, Harold R. Mathematics: A Human Endeavor. 2nd ed. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman, 1982.Google Scholar
  5. Kline, Morris. Mathematics for Liberal Arts. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1967.Google Scholar
  6. Newman, James R. The World of Mathematics. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.Google Scholar
  7. Scientific American. Mathematics in the Modern World: Readings from Scientific American. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman, 1968.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Goldstein
    • 1
  • Inge Goldstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Yeshiva UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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